English - Latin Dictionary:

wolf

Was this translation helpful? Add to favorites!
The definition of word "wolf":
+2 rate 1. Gray wolf (Canis lupus). either of two species of wild doglike carnivores of the family Canidae. The gray or timber, wolf (Canis lupus) is the best-known species. It is the largest wild member of the dog family and still inhabits large areas in the Northern Hemisphere. The red wolf (Canis rufus) is somewhat smaller and occupies a much more restricted range. The gray wolf has a larger natural distribution than any other mammal except human beings. It formerly inhabited all of North America from Alaska and Arctic Canada south to central Mexico and was found throughout Europe and Asia southward to the Mediterranean Sea, the Arabian Peninsula and parts of India and China. It lived in every type of habitat in the Northern Hemisphere except tropical forests and arid deserts. The gray wolf has been eliminated from much of its original range, however and its numbers are dwindling in many areas. In North America it is now found primarily in Canada and Alaska, with much smaller numbers in Minnesota and Mexico. In 1995 wolves were reintroduced in wilderness areas of the northern Rocky Mountains. Large numbers of gray wolves still live in Russia and neighbouring countries and in the Balkans, with much smaller populations isolated in parts of central and southern Europe and Scandinavia. The gray wolf is a powerful animal with a broad head, robust limbs, large feet and deep but narrow chest. Excluding certain domestic breeds of dogs, it is the largest living canid. A northern male may be about 2 m (6.5 feet) long, including the bushy, 50-centimetre (20-inch) tail and weigh 20 to 80 kg (44 to 175 pounds). Females are slightly smaller than males and southern races of wolves tend to be smaller than northern ones. The fur of the gray wolf is dense, long and soft. The fur on the upper body, though usually gray, may be brown, reddish, black or whitish, while the underparts and legs are usually yellow-white. An intelligent, social animal that was admired by the American Indians, the gray wolf usually lives in packs of several to two dozen individuals. A pack is basically a family group consisting of an adult pair and their offspring of various ages. There is a clearly defined dominance hierarchy in the pack, with only the lead male and female (the alpha pair) possessing the right to mate. They are usually the parents of the other pack members. A pack's home range or territory, typically amounts to one hundred or several hundred square kilometres and is actively defended against neighbouring packs. The group howling that wolves engage in serves to solidify a pack's social structure and signal its presence to neighbouring packs. Wolves move and hunt mostly at night. A wolf pack feeds primarily on large herbivores such as deer, moose and caribou, which it catches by a stalk and a chase. The pack gorges when food is available, usually reducing the carcass to hair and a few bones. In its hunting the gray wolf performs an important natural function in controlling the numbers of large herbivores and in weeding out those less fit for survival. Unfortunately, it may attack domestic livestock and has thus undergone persecution by humans. There have been few, if any, substantiated wolf attacks on humans in North America, but such attacks, though unusual, have definitely occurred in Eurasia and have sometimes resulted in death. Gray wolves breed between January and April and a litter of 6 to 7 pups (on average) is born in the spring after a gestation period of about 63 days. The young are reared in a den consisting of a natural hole or a burrow, usually in a hillside. All the members of a pack care solicitously for the young, who are fed with meat regurgitated by their parents after a hunt. Juveniles remain with the pack until they reach sexual maturity at less than two years, after which they leave to search for a mate and establish new territories. The red wolf (C. rufus) is a tawny, reddish or black canid of the south-central United States. It grows to a length of about 105125 cm, excluding the tail, which is 3343 cm long and weighs about 1437 kg. It is an endangered species; the total population in the late 20th century appeared to be fewer than 100. The largest known wolf, the dire wolf (C. dirus), was common in western North America during the Pleistocene but is now extinct; it was half again as large as the modern gray wolf. The coyote, a North American canid, is sometimes called prairie, brush or little, wolf. For other animals known as wolves but not of the genus Canis, see maned wolf; aardwolf; Tasmanian wolf. The Antarctic wolf, now extinct, was a South American fox of the Falkland Islands.
+2 rate 2. dire wolf
rate 3. anagram flow
rate 4. anagram fowl
rate 5. Everquest Spirit of Wolf. cf. SoW.
rate 6. E A T (v) (informal) to eat a large amount (of food) very quickly My brother was wolfing biscuits while he watched T V. The boys wolfed the sandwiches (down) and then started on the cakes. (T or M)
rate 7. born July 9, 1933, London, Eng. British-U.S. neurologist and writer. He immigrated to the United States in 1960 to study neurology at the University of California and in 1965 he joined the faculty at New York's Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Many of his books relate case histories of neurologically damaged people. His empathy with those afflicted with strange conditions, including Tourette syndrome, amnesia and autism, has been the hallmark of his writings. His book Awakenings (1973), about the long-term effects of sleeping sickness, was filmed in 1990; other books include The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1986) and An Anthropologist on Mars (1995).
rate 8. orig. Christa Ihlenfeld; born March 18, 1929, Landsberg an der Warthe, Ger. German novelist, essayist and screenwriter. She was reared in a middle-class, pro-Nazi family; after Germany's defeat in 1945, she moved with her family to East Germany. Her work reflects her experiences during World War II and her postwar life in a communist state. Her novels include Divided Heaven (1963), which brought her political favour; The Quest for Christa T. (1968), severely attacked in East Germany; A Model Childhood (1976); Cassandra (1983), her most widely read book, linking nuclear and patriarchal power; and What Remains (1990), on government surveillance and her own links to the East German secret police.
rate 9. born March 13, 1860, Windischgraz, Austria; died February 22, 1903, Vienna; Austrian composer. He entered the Vienna Conservatory at age 15, but, as a rabid Wagnerian, he lost patience with his teachers' conservatism and soon left. By age 18 he probably had contracted the syphilis that would make him mentally unstable and eventually kill him. His volatile personality made it difficult for him to keep private students. As a critic (1884–87), he attracted attention for his vituperative comments. His productivity came in bursts; in 1888–89 he produced the remarkable songs of the Mörike Lieder, the Eichendorff Lieder, the Goethe Lieder and much of the Spanish Songbook; more than half his total output. After beginning the Italian Songbook in 1891, he wrote nothing for three years, then quickly composed the opera Der Corregidor (1896) and finished the Italian Songbook (1896). In 1897 he suffered a complete breakdown and he thereafter lived largely in an asylum.
rate 10. born March 13, 1860, Windischgraz, Austria; died February 22, 1903, Vienna; Austrian composer. He entered the Vienna Conservatory at age 15, but, as a rabid Wagnerian, he lost patience with his teachers' conservatism and soon left. By age 18 he probably had contracted the syphilis that would make him mentally unstable and eventually kill him. His volatile personality made it difficult for him to keep private students. As a critic (1884–87), he attracted attention for his vituperative comments. His productivity came in bursts; in 1888–89 he produced the remarkable songs of the Mörike Lieder, the Eichendorff Lieder, the Goethe Lieder and much of the Spanish Songbook; more than half his total output. After beginning the Italian Songbook in 1891, he wrote nothing for three years, then quickly composed the opera Der Corregidor (1896) and finished the Italian Songbook (1896). In 1897 he suffered a complete breakdown and he thereafter lived largely in an asylum.
rate 11. Any of three extant species of canine. The gray, or timber, wolf (Canis lupus) is the ancestor of all domestic dogs. It once had the largest distribution of any mammal except human beings, but it is now found primarily in Canada, Alaska, the Balkans and Russia. Wolves are intelligent and social. Their primary prey are deer, moose and caribou, though they feed on many smaller animals as well. Because wolves have killed livestock, they have been persecuted by farmers and ranchers. A male gray wolf may be 7 ft (2 m) long and weigh up to 175 lb (80 kg); it is the largest living wild canid. Gray wolves live in hierarchical packs whose territories cover at least 38 sq mi (100 sq km) and hunt mostly at night. The much smaller red wolf (C. rufus), once widespread in the south-central U.S., has been bred in captivity and reintroduced. The Abyssinian wolf (C. simensis) of Ethiopia was formerly considered a jackal.
rate 12. Sacks Oliver Wolf
rate 13. Tasmanian wolf
rate 14. wolf spider
rate 15. Wolf Christa
rate 16. Wolf Hugo Filipp Jakob;
Please rate the definition of "wolf" which is the most useful for you.
 
We have found the following latin words and translations for "wolf":
English Latin
So, this is how you say "wolf" in latin.
 
Up to now, 1,102,728 words and expressions have been searched, among 1 today.
The most recently searched words / expressions in the dictionary:

English - Latin Dictionary
yet, fill, cheek, to sojourn, proclaim, strength, ale, smoke-filled, friskily, fail

Latin - English Dictionary
uti, bis, ingredior, avi, daedalus, orno, ab, cunae, clinamen, thesis

Latin - German Dictionary
c licinius macer, dies iovis, vita, videt, videre, spes, scaurus, secutus sum, transire, scapium

German - Latin Dictionary
fundament, herbeitragen, gast, klima, lenken, schwanger, bann, seine, masse, herr
Tags: wolf, lupus, lupus, English - Latin Dictionary, English, Latin, translation, online dictionary English
 
Top 10 searched words
1. 29,745
2. 22,350
3. 16,916
4. 12,746
5. 11,278
6. 5,626
7. 5,397
8. 5,005
9. 4,574
10. 4,261

 
Place the code below wherever you want the dictionary widget to appear on your website:


The widget will appear like this:


Powered by translate-latin.com
Embed this dictionary on your own site:

Click here to get the necessary HTML code
0.0093 / 0.0040 (33)
Back to top